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Thin Paspalum

Description

Thin (bull) paspalum is common in sandy soils in disturbed, open areas throughout the Coastal plain region. Dallisgrass, field paspalum, and thin paspalum resemble each other, and thin paspalum is often mistakenly called dallisgrass. Thin paspalum has a glossier, more shiny leaf when young than dallisgrass. Dallisgrass leaf appearance is very similar to crabgrass, which is a dull green appearance.

Cultural Control

Perennial grass weeds are not desirable as turfgrass species under any conditions. Therefore, every effort should be made to prevent these weedy grasses from becoming established in turf, as selective control measures are usually difficult. Selection of adapted turfgrass species and cultivars and the use of cultural practices are important in minimizing weedy grass encroachment and competition. Management practices include (1) mowing at the recommended height for the selected turfgrass and removing clippings when seedheads of grassy weeds are present; (2) applying the proper amount of nitrogen at the correct time according to the turfgrass present; and (3) using soil tests to determine needed nutrients and lime.

Presentations

Publications

Species Data

Seedhead/Flower

raceme; 1-6 spikelets per stalk

seedhead2
seedhead2
seedhead2
Vernation type

rolled

leaves
leaves
leaves
Ligule Type

small, membranous w/ fringe of hairs on top

ligule
ligule
ligule
Growth Season/Life Cycle

perennial weed

Auricle type

absent

Leaf blade tip shape

sharp-pointed; hairy to almost smooth; wavy edges

Stolon Presence

absent

Rhizome Presence

present; short

Collar Type

continuous

Sheath Margin

open; there is a fringe of hair along the margin of the sheath

Sheath Type

flattened

leaves
leaves
leaves