2016 Fall Armyworm Alert

— Written By NC State Extension
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2016 Fall Armyworm Alert

by Terri Billeisen

Fall armyworms have hit North Carolina! Reports of damage have been mostly concentrated in the southern part of the state along the South Carolina border, but it is only a matter of time until they move northward.

Now is the time to start monitoring for egg masses on plants, objects and buildings adjacent to a turfgrass stand. As soon as the eggs hatch, caterpillars will immediately start feeding on nearby turf so early detection is essential to anticipating and preventing severe armyworm damage. Once they are detected, there are a number of products that are effective at reducing armyworm populations.

For information on chemical control of fall armyworms, please see the TurfFiles article at www.turffiles.ncsu.edu/insects/fall-armyworm.